Walk This Wey

Guildford to Pyrford

Walk This Wey > Guildford to Pyrford

Introduction

This walk pases through central Guildford and the northern outskirts of the town, past Dapdune Wharf where boat trips are available. Continuing to the north the path goes into beautiful countryside passing through the edge of Sutton Green, Send, Ripley and Pyrford to Pyrford Lock. The towpath also pases the remains of Newark Priory near Pyrford.

Getting to the Start

Guildford has good road access with the A3 (London to Portsmouth) road passing near to the town centre, as well as the A322 ,A320 and A25 roads passing through or near the town. Parking in Guildford is limited and can be expensive, especially on week days, however park and ride services do operate.

Guildford also has good public transport links, being on the main line from London to Portsmouth, with frequent fast trains from London Waterloo to Guildford taking around 35 minutes. These trains also normally call at Woking, Haslemere, Petersfield, Havant and Portsmouth and some also call at other local stations, including Godalming. Guildford also has frequent local rail services from London Waterloo (via Epsom and Effingham Junction and via Chobham) from Ascot (via Camberley and Aldershot) and from Reading and Gatwick Airport. Local buses link Guildford with many local towns and villages.

The Walk

From the centre of Guildford join the river at the bottom of the High Street. From here you pass under the road bridge and then Onslow Bridge before passing some tall industrial buildings on your left and the Odeon Cinema on your right, passing under another small footbridge.

Central Guildford Central Guildford
Central Guildford Central Guildford

Continuing to walk past industrial units the river then enters a bend where there is the lovely Dapdune Wharf, owned by the National Trust, from where you can (during the summer) take boat trips. Beyond the Wharf is the large viaduct that carries the railway line towards Clandon and London.

Dapdune Wharf The Railway Viaduct
Dapdune Wharf The Railway Viaduct

Under the railway line you pass some more industrial buildings on either side of the river before you approach the road bridge. Sadly you cannot go under this bridge and so must cross the road, which involves crossing 5 lanes of fast-moving traffic (although there is an island in the middle), so take care here.

The A25 bridge
The A25 bridge

Shortly after this bridge you'll then pass under the A3 dual-carriageway which the path now goes adjacent to for the next couple of miles. Once away from the A3 the path then pases countryside on the right and houses backing on to the river on the opposite bank and passing under trees on the bank with the towpath. Soon you come to the Rowbarge pub on the opposite bank of the river.

The River Wey near Bellfields The Rowbarge on the opposite bank
The River Wey near Bellfields The Rowbarge on the opposite bank

Just after the pub you have to cross to the opposite bank and over another busy road (this time the A320) where the traffic is also very quick. Once across the river there is some industrial buildings to the left, but soon you get to the pretty Stoke Lock with the lock keepers cottage.

Stoke Lock ahead Stoke Lock
Stoke Lock ahead The Lockkeeprs Cottage at Stoke Lock

Beyond Stoke Lock the river becomes more rural in setting despite the noise of the nearby A3 road. Some of the trees on the left look to be very old. Soon you get to a weir near Burpham and then come to Bower's Lock.

The Wey beyond Stoke Lock The Wey beyond Stoke Lock
The Wey beyond Stoke Lock The Wey beyond Stoke Lock
Bower's Lock Bower's Lock
Bower's Lock Bower's Lock

At Bower's Lock the path crosses to the opposite bank again. There is now a nice section of countryside where at last the path turns away from the A3 and the noise from the road dies down. Soon you come to a weir and a footbridge at Broadoak where the river turns quite sharply. Soon you can see the church at Send over fields in the distance and at Wareham's Farm there is another small bridge over the river.

Send Church The River Wey from the bridge at Wareham's Farm
Send Church The River Wey from the bridge at Wareham's Farm

Shortly after this bridge you come to the next lock on the river, Triggs Lock. There is another pretty lock keepers cottage here and the whole lock has a very rural feel with fields all around.

Approaching Triggs Lock Triggs Lock
Approaching Triggs Lock Triggs Lock
Triggs Lock
Triggs Lock

Beyond Triggs Lock you pass a small part of the river that was cut to form the Wey Navigation then come to Worsfold Gates.

The Wey between Triggs Lock and Worsfold Gates Worsfold Gates
Between Triggs Lock and Worsfold Gates Worsfold Gates

Soon you come to Cartbridge on the edge of Send where there is a large brick bridge, which again you can't walk under so you have to climb it and cross the A247 road. Once across, the river turns to the right, passing another footbridge at Broad Mead. On the right you soon pass some industrial buildings near Prews Farm and then another footbridge beyond this building. Soon you come to Papercourt Lock. This impressive lock has a weir with three levels, with the lock gates adjacent to it.

Papercourt Lock Papercourt Lock
Papercourt Lock Papercourt Lock

Soon the river comes to Newark Bridge and Lock where the are a couple of very old buildings.

Buildings near Newark Bridge Buildings near Newark Lock
Buildings near Newark Bridge Buildings near Newark Bridge

Just after Newark Bridge you come to the lock and soon after that you come to the remains of Newark Priory although sadly it is not possible to walk around the remains of the priory. Beyond the priory I found a sunken boat, still tied to the bank, even though the other end of one of the ropes was now underwater where it was tied to the boat. A little further up there are a few narrow boats moored.

The remains of Newark Priory The narrow boat Carnzu
Newark Priory Narrow Boats on the Wey

Soon the path comes to Walsham Lock where there is another large weir, which this time you have to cross on the bridge. Beyond the lock there are some more narrow boats moored on the river and on the opposite bank, an unusual building, which is part of Pyrford Place and is reputed to have been used by Elizabeth I and John Donne.

Narrow boats near Walsham Lock An folly on the oppsosite bank near Walsham Lock
Narrow boats near Walsham Lock A folly on the opposite bank near Walsham Lock

Beyond Walsham Lock the path passes near to Home Farm and there are more narrow boats moored on the side of the river near here. Soon Pyrford Lock can be seen ahead with The Anchor Pub the most obvious land mark.

Near Pryford Lock Pryford Lock
Pyrford Lock ahead Pyrford Lock ahead

Getting Back

Pyrford lock is close to the village of Pyrford and the town of West Byfleet. To get to West Byfleet continue along the river beyond the lock to the next bridge (Dodd's Bridge). On the bridge, turn left and follow the path. When another path turns off to the left ignore it and continue on the main path. Soon the path turns left and emerges into a small road. When this reaches the main road (Pyrford Road) turn right. You walk along residential streets until you get to the centre of the town. At the junction of the roads by Barclays Bank cross the main road heading towards the library. Walk along the small parade of shops past the large office block on the left and Woolworths and you'll see the station straight ahead. West Byfleet station used to have direct trains twice an hour to Guildford, but sadly these have now been withdrawn. Instead you need to take the first train to Woking (generally 4 per hour Monday - Saturday and two per hour on Sundays). On arrival at Woking you need to change for Guildford. Trains from Woking to Guildford run four times an hour seven days a week. On Sunday afternoons there are two direct trains an hour from West Byfleet to Guildford. Total journey time, if you don't have to wait long for a connection, is around 20 minutes, or 15 minutes on a direct train. All these trains are operated by South West Trains.

Links

The following web sites provide information on the area.


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